Conflicts between armed groups in South Sudan worsen the humanitarian situation

Date:

Conflicts between armed groups in South Sudan worsen

  • news by AUN News correspondent
  • Thursday, December 29, 2022
  • AUN News – ISSN: 2949-8090

Summary:

  • Reports say 30,000 people have had to leave their homes because of recent fighting between armed groups in the Greater Pibor Administrative Area.

  • Violence has forced thousands of people to leave their homes and destroyed property and cattle stolen.”

  • “South Sudan’s most vulnerable people are still being hurt by the effects of years of social and political instability, lack of food security, and climate-related shocks like flooding.

  • In 2023, 9.4 million people are likely to need humanitarian aid and protection, and 2.8 million are likely to have been physically hurt, such as by rape or other forms of violence against women, and need protection.

  • Over 2.2 million displaced people cannot return to their homes for an extended period.

Reports say 30,000 people have had to leave their homes because of recent fighting between armed groups in the Greater Pibor Administrative Area. On December 24, young people with guns from the state of Jonglei attacked towns in the Greater Pibor Administrative Area. “Violence has forced thousands of people to leave their homes, destroyed property, and stolen cattle.” “After fleeing the war zones of Gumuruk and Lekuangole, about 5,000 people, including women and children, have arrived in Pibor town.” People have endured enough pain. South Sudan’s humanitarian coordinator, Ms. Sara Beysolow Nyanti, says, “Civilians, especially the most vulnerable, like women, children, the elderly, and people with disabilities, bear the weight of this long-running conflict.”

Partners in humanitarian work are giving individuals harmed by violence much-needed support.

The most recent fight happened after fighting in Fashoda County, Upper Nile State, which caused a large number of people to leave their homes in mid-November 2022. The UN is still helping with this crisis. Ms. Hamida R. Lasseko, who works for UNICEF in South Sudan, was in Malakal, Upper Nile State, to see the ongoing humanitarian work. There, she told people how worried she was. She said, “The rise of violence in different parts of the country has forced some vulnerable people to flee for safety in different directions, where they desperately need help.” The continuous violence hurts South Sudan’s already stretched-thin humanitarian activities, creating new gaps. “This strains resources and the humanitarian response further.” Ms. Lasseko continued, “If we want to save the lives of the newly displaced people, we must put their urgent needs first.”

South Sudan’s most vulnerable people are still being hurt by years of social and political instability, a lack of food security, and climate-related shocks like flooding. In 2022, thousands of people will have been hurt by the ongoing conflict, which includes violence at the subnational level. As a result, people have been forced to move, lost lives, and destroyed livelihoods. Also, this has made people even more vulnerable, making it more vital to get life-saving protection and humanitarian aid. “The fighting needs to stop,” said Ms. Nyanti. “The humanitarian community is asking all armed groups to stop fighting immediately, follow international humanitarian law, and protect civilians and aid workers.” “Impunity is a sustaining element and the fundamental source of conflict and insecurity.” Accountability is necessary, she insists.

In 2023, 9.4 million people are likely to need humanitarian aid and protection, and 2.8 million are likely to have been physically hurt, such as by rape or other forms of violence against women, and need protection. Over 2.2 million displaced people cannot return to their homes for an extended period. The continual decline in people’s physical and mental health, living standards, and coping strategies, Ms. Nyanti added, “truly concerns me.” She continued, “Peace is a requirement for people to reconstruct their lives.”

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