UN convoys transport life-saving supplies to Ukraine’s war-torn east

Date:

UN convoys transport life-saving supplies to Ukraine's war-torn east

  • News by AUN News correspondent
  • Saturday, February 04, 2023
  • AUN News – ISSN: 2949-8090

Summary:

  • A five-truck interagency convoy arrived in the village of Hulyaipole, home to Europe’s largest nuclear power station and about 3,000 people still living near the front lines.

  • In the line of fire since March of last year, 30 settlements near Hulyaipole have been without electricity because of damage to the energy infrastructure caused by fighting.

  • Lifeline of DniproTuesday, also leaving from Dnipro, a six-truck convoy carrying supplies from the UN International Organization for Migration (IOM), the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), and the UN World Health Organization arrived in the town of Toretsk, which is about 10 kilometres from the front line in the Donetsk oblast (WHO).In addition, the convoy had supplies for trauma, and emergency surgery kits for the roughly 15,000 residents of Toretsk, which had a population of 75,000 before Russia’s full-scale invasion began on February 24 of last year.

  • No-go areas the past 11 months, more than 30 interagency convoys have made it to vulnerable villages in Ukraine’s eastern oblasts. Still, none have made it to territory held by Russian forces or their allies.

  • WHO: We intend to remain WHO’s most recent report on attacks on health care, which came out on Thursday, says that since the invasion began about a year ago, there have been 764 attacks, in which 101 people have died, and 131 have been hurt.

During “normal” shelling attacks, supplies like medicines, roofing repair kits, bottled water, and solar lamps were unloaded. This brought attention to the situation of thousands of civilians who can’t or won’t leave their homes.

A five-truck interagency convoy arrived in the village of Hulyaipole, which is home to Europe’s largest nuclear power station and has about 3,000 people still living nearby the front lines.

Jens Laerke, a spokesman for OCHA, the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, said that they include the elderly, people with limited mobility, and families with children who are “exposed to regular shelling” and can’t get essential services.

He told the media in Geneva that because there is no power, water facilities cannot function and water must be pulled from wells or brought in bottles.

In the line of fire

Since March of last year, 30 settlements near Hulyaipole have been without electricity because of damage to the energy infrastructure caused by fighting. Repairs are desperately needed to ward off the “savage” winter, but Mr. Laerke added that this is impossible as long as the violence persists.

Lifeline of Dnipro

Tuesday, also leaving from Dnipro, a six-truck convoy carrying supplies from the UN International Organization for Migration (IOM), the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), and the UN World Health Organization arrived in the town of Toretsk, which is about 10 kilometers from the front line in the Donetsk oblast (WHO).

In addition, the convoy had supplies for trauma and emergency surgery kits for the roughly 15,000 residents of Toretsk, which had a population of 75,000 before Russia’s full-scale invasion began on February 24 of last year.

No-go areas

In the past 11 months, more than 30 interagency convoys have made it to vulnerable villages in Ukraine’s eastern oblasts, but none have yet made it to territory held by Russian forces or their allies.

According to Mr. Laerke, “We have a humanitarian notification system where we tell the parties to the conflict where we are going and with what stuff.” It’s only to serve as a reminder that they have a responsibility to safeguard such movements and make sure they can be carried out securely.

The OCHA official went on to say, “We have not been given the right guarantees of safety to go to these places,” even though “a number of notifications” had been sent to get to places under the control of the Russian military.

WHO: We intend to remain

The WHO’s most recent report on attacks on health care, which came out on Thursday, says that since the invasion began about a year ago, there have been 764 attacks, in which 101 people have died and 131 have been hurt.

At a press conference held in Kyiv earlier this week, the WHO in Ukraine said that the agency was “here to stay and continues to deliver important medicines and supplies with the help of its partners.”

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