UN and partners make a $4.3 billion appeal for Yemeni relief operations

Date:

UN and partners make a $4.3 billion appeal for Yemeni relief operations

  • News by AUN News correspondent
  • Monday, February 27, 2023
  • AUN News – ISSN: 2949-8090

Summary:

  • “Funding and dedication, but because more than 21 million Yemenis, or two-thirds of the population, still need assistance and protection, the demand for humanitarian aid is still rising.

  • Since 2011, fighting between Saudi Arabia-backed government forces and Houthi rebels has caused much harm to Yemen’s people.

  • At risk are ‘Fragile’ gainsHumanitarian organisations received $2.2 billion in financing last year, enabling them to provide nearly 11 million people each month with food, water, housing, education, and other life-saving aid.

  • The UN Secretary-General and the governments of Sweden and Switzerland are hosting the pledge conference.

  • At this time when they are most in need, I hope that the international community will seize the chance to continue its support for the people of Yemen.

Even though there was a six-month peace last year, many people are still hurting, mainly because the economy is bad and essential services have stopped working.

After years of death, displacement, damage, malnutrition, and suffering, António Guterres, the Secretary-General of the United Nations, said that the end of the fighting “brought people important benefits.”

Funding and dedication

But because more than 21 million Yemenis, or two-thirds of the population, still need assistance and protection, the demand for humanitarian aid is still rising.

“The world community has the ability and resources to end this disaster.” And it starts with fully supporting our request and promising to distribute funds as soon as possible,” he said.

Since 2011, fighting between Saudi Arabia-backed government forces and Houthi rebels has caused much harm to Yemen’s people. Due to severe drought and flooding, individuals’ lives, safety, and well-being are also in danger.

Yemen is also home to about 100,000 refugees and people seeking asylum from other war-torn countries, mainly Somalia and Ethiopia. This is even though the country’s communities are already full.

At risk are ‘Fragile’ gains

Humanitarian organisations received $2.2 billion in financing last year, enabling them to provide nearly 11 million people each month with food, water, housing, education, and other life-saving aid.

Mr. Guterres said that because of their work, the ceasefire, and other things, two million fewer Yemenis were severely hungry, and the number of people in famine-like conditions dropped from over 150,000 to almost zero.

He cautioned, “Yet these improvements remain frail.”

“Aid organisations will be compelled to reduce or cease programming, at an enormous human cost, if assistance dries up now.”

A humanitarian crisis

He outlined barriers to assistance distribution such as bureaucratic bottlenecks, interference, and mobility limitations – particularly in Houthi-controlled areas – and added that in addition to helping, humanitarians also require safe access to all civilians in need.

Even worse, he continued, “help workers themselves are coming under attack more frequently.”

“I call on all parties to the conflict to make sure that humanitarian aid gets to all people who need it in a safe, quick, and unhindered way,” as international humanitarian law requires.

Peace is still essential

Martin Griffiths, the UN’s coordinator for humanitarian affairs and emergency relief, observed that the international community was coming together once more to show that it was committed to aiding Yemen in resolving its situation.

He said that necessitates continuing—no, intensifying—efforts to find peace.

“It entails supporting the relief effort so that life-saving initiatives can continue to ward off the worst. And it involves helping assistance organisations in their efforts to provide a moral reaction throughout the nation.

The UN Secretary-General and the governments of Sweden and Switzerland are hosting the pledge conference.

Ignazio Cassis, Head of the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs of Switzerland, stated that supporting the Yemeni people is crucial now more than ever.

“It is our joint duty to continue giving Yemeni women, men, and children our full support. Give them hope for a better future, please.

Johan Forssell, Sweden’s Minister for Foreign Trade and International Development Cooperation, emphasised his Government’s commitment to participating in international humanitarian efforts.

“We cannot allow Yemen’s life-saving activities to stop. At this time when they are most in need, I hope that the international community will seize the chance to continue its support for the people of Yemen.

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