The Ukrainian refugees are settling in a new country

Date:

The Ukrainian refugees are settling in a new country

  • News by AUN News correspondent
  • Tuesday, April 11, 2023
  • AUN News – ISSN: 2949-8090

Summary:

  • In February 2022, Oleksiy Danko and Anastacia Kozmina made the decision to flee Ukraine as soon as they heard about the bombing.

  • She made the decision to use her talents and enthusiasm to find a full-time sewing job after struggling to get her wedding-dress business off the ground in the UK. Although it has been upsetting to not be able to continue her business, Yulia claims she is content with her new life.

  • “According to Regina, they felt like they could start over because of the reception they received in Australia.

  • Due to the fact that business profits in Ukraine are only 10% of what they were prior to the war, Vlodymyr now works full-time.

  • “The people of Ukraine are currently so worn out from the war that they are losing their trust.”

It was a really trying time for usIn February 2022, Oleksiy Danko and Anastacia Kozmina made the decision to flee Ukraine as soon as they heard about the bombing. They joined the roughly eight million other Ukrainians who were seeking a safe place to live and work.

When the couple arrived in the UK, they discovered that the people were “warm-hearted” and “supportive,” but it was difficult to find work. So they established their own company.

Refugees from Ukraine are dispersed throughout the globe. This is the tale of how several Ukrainians are seeking new sources of income.

“It was a really trying time for us.”

Oleksiyy was a licensed pharmacist in Ukraine, while Anastasia was employed as a lawyer there. For extra cash, they also dry-cleaned furniture.

When the bombing started on February 24, 2022, Anastacia claimed she knew she did not want to live in a war zone.

The pair posted a request for sponsorship on Facebook after learning that friends of theirs had relocated to England. They eventually made it to Southport, Merseyside.

It was a very trying time for us, according to Anastacia. “I stopped doing my nails, hair, and makeup… I took six months to regroup and realize that I was in a secure environment.

Anastacia attempted to obtain employment as a lawyer but was unsuccessful because the UK has a distinct legal system. The pair so decided to start a business dry-cleaning furniture using their side-hustle expertise.

After printing some flyers, they were astonished to receive calls from people asking them to clean things that weren’t genuinely unclean.

“Oleksiyy once went to clean a small sofa, and this lady gave us some lovely flowers as a gesture of support,” she said. She was genuinely kind-hearted and wanted to help us, the woman said.

They intend to keep growing the company because, as she puts it, “we have another life in England, an opportunity to develop ourselves, to grow.”

“I know I’m capable of living a better life.”

"I know I'm capable of living a better life."She traveled for three days with her two girls, their dog, and a sponsor she found in Nottingham. Because her husband is still in Ukraine, Yulia begged that we refrain from using her last name.

Her sponsor advised her to restart the lucrative wedding dress business she ran back home.

She says, “It’s a wild idea, but I think I can try… my career is my life.”

Her sewing machines, fabrics, and mannequins were brought over by a friend of Yulia’s husband, who was traveling to the UK.

It’s difficult because the English business system differs from the Ukrainian one, according to Yulia.

She made the decision to use her talents and enthusiasm to find a full-time sewing job after struggling to get her wedding-dress business off the ground in the UK.

Although it has been upsetting to not be able to continue her business, Yulia claims she is content with her new life.

“We have a great home, nice jobs, and a nice family… I might consider myself fortunate because I do what I enjoy.

She claims that if she had a little more time, she will try starting her business again.

To feel healthier, you must keep your mind active

To feel healthier, you must keep your mind activeWhen Russia invaded Ukraine, Polina was preparing the students at her dance school for a competition.

Everything you planned doesn’t make sense now that war has broken out, she claims.

In Lviv, Polina knew that the tank factory she lived next to would be a target. She left for Poland the next morning and joined her sister a month later, who had been residing in Canada for a few years.

Because you are still a part of Ukraine and you are in Canada, it was quite challenging mentally, according to the woman.

She continues, “You need to do something. You need to keep your mind active to feel better.

Despite having a job in recruitment, Polina’s true calling was in dance instruction.

She began Polli’s Dance, renting space in a studio, and began instructing Canadian kids as well as kids of other Ukrainian refugees.

She claims, “I sense this energy exchange with children. It’s something that brings me joy.

  • The major Ukrainian cities that Russia is focusing on
  • Repairing the war-torn electricity grid in Ukraine on the front lines with engineers
  • The difficulties of providing Ukraine with fighter jets

I can’t help but feel terrified inside.

I can't help but feel terrified insideA year ago, Volodymyr and Regina Razumovskaya emigrated from Ukraine.

When Russian separatists captured the area in 2014, and their business was destroyed, they had already been evicted from their house in Donetsk.

The pair fled to Kyiv, where they opened a new plant-selling business.

But when Russia invaded, the family was once more forced to evacuate, this time to Perth, Western Australia, where they joined friends.

“Can you imagine leaving your house alone? To go about your business? To depart from your friends? Regina enquires.

“Even after a year has passed, I still feel this fear inside because you never know what will happen.”

According to Regina, they felt like they could start over because of the reception they received in Australia.

Due to the fact that business profits in Ukraine are only 10% of what they were prior to the war, Vlodymyr now works full-time.

Regina said, “You buy plants when you believe there is a future for you.

“The people of Ukraine are currently so worn out from the war that they are losing their trust.”

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