The Largest-Yet Edition of the ADAA Art Show Will Highlight Decades of Philanthropy This November

Date:

The Largest-Yet Edition of the ADAA Art Show Will Highlight

  • News by AUN News correspondent
  • Monday, October 24, 2022.
  • AUN News – ISSN: 2949-8090

Summary:

  • The Art Show’s 34th edition (November 3–6, 2022) will be the biggest yet, with 78 ADAA member galleries participating.

  • In 1989, the Henry Street Settlement and the ADAA worked together to make The Art Show the organization’s most significant event every year.

  • Over $35 million has been raised for the nonprofit to date by The Art Show.

  • For the past 35 years, the Art Show has raised money for the Settlement, one of the country’s oldest social service, arts, and healthcare organizations.

  • At the art expo, which will also be it’s most significant, there will be a record number of booths for single artists.

The Art Show’s 34th edition (November 3–6, 2022) will be the biggest yet, with 78 ADAA member galleries participating. This is fitting since the Art Dealers Association of America (ADAA) is celebrating its 60th anniversary this year.

In 1989, the Henry Street Settlement and the ADAA worked together to make The Art Show the organization’s most significant event every year. Henry Street Settlement was one of the first nonprofit organizations in the country to offer a wide range of social services that directly benefit New Yorkers, from housing and healthcare to education and employment. Over $35 million has been raised for the nonprofit to date by The Art Show. The Executive Director of the ADAA, Maureen Bray, said this about this partnership: “I am very proud of the ADAA’s work with Henry Street Settlement. For the past 35 years, the Art Show has raised money for the Settlement, one of the country’s oldest social service, arts, and healthcare organizations. The Art Show continues to work with the Settlement in new and exciting ways, especially now that the art world is trying to make more inclusive spaces.

The ADAA is expanding its humanitarian efforts in additional ways. As part of its 60th Anniversary Grants, announced last month, the organization gave a one-time grant of $10,000 to six national nonprofits that have changed access to the arts in their communities and regions. The ADAA has also started three other projects: a larger Relief Fund to help cultural institutions that natural disasters have hurt; a Member Video Interview Series, which is an archive that dealers and ADAA members can use as a resource; and a 60th Anniversary Membership Directory, which highlights member galleries and what they do for the creative sector.

Along with these other celebrations, this year’s art show is expected to be a big deal. At the art expo, which will also be its most significant, there will be a record number of booths for single artists. These booths were made to offer the same rich, curated exhibition experience as a gallery. Along with the fair, there are a lot of events, such as panels led by Andrew Goldstein and Julia Halperin of Artnet News.

The ADAA’s 60th anniversary and The Art Show’s 34th anniversary show how dedicated the organization is to promoting its member galleries and the creative communities in the area and across the country.

Below are some upcoming The Art Show highlights.

Geoffrey Holder, New York Beauty (1992). Courtesy of James Fuentes.

Geoffrey Holder, “New York Beauty” (1992). Courtesy of James Fuentes.

Gladys Nilsson, Dipped Dick: Adam and Eve After Cranach (1971). Courtesy of Garth Greenan Gallery.

Jodi Bieber, Alexandra Township, Johannesburh (1993). Courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York.

Jodi Bieber, Alexandra Township, Johannesburg (1993). Courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York.

Yoko Ono, Painting to Be Stepped On (1966/1988). © Yoko Ono, Courtesy Galerie Lelong and Co., New York.

Yoko Ono, Painting to Be Stepped On (1966–1988).  Yoko Ono, Courtesy of Galerie Lelong & Co., New York.

Joana Choumali, THE MOON MUST BE WAITING FOR US (2022). Courtesy of the artist and Sperone Westwater, New York.

Joana Choumali, THE MOON MUST BE WAITING FOR US (2022). Courtesy of the artist and Sperone Westwater, New York.

Flora Crockett, Untitled (ca. 1940s–50s). Courtesy of Meredith Ward Fine Art, New York.

Flora Crockett, Untitled (ca. 1940s–50s). Courtesy of Meredith Ward Fine Art, New York.

Edward Hopper, American Landscape (1920). Courtesy of Susan Sheehan Gallery.

Edward Hopper, American Landscape (1920). Courtesy of Susan Sheehan Gallery.

Analysis by: Advocacy Unified Network

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