Survivors of gender-based violence: Hope at long last

Date:

Survivors of gender-based violence: Hope at long last

  • news by AUN News correspondent
  • Tuesday, December 13, 2022
  • AUN News – ISSN: 2949-8090

Summary:

  • Relevant stakeholders issued a rallying cry to eradicate stigma, gender discrimination, and all stereotypes against survivors of violence against women and girls after this year’s 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence.
  • Different forms of violence, particularly directed against women and children, are widespread in South Sudan.

  • Domestic violence, early or forced marriages, and sexual assaults, including rapes, are the three main types of violent crimes that are commonly committed; rape is frequently used as a weapon of war, according to Ms. Natepi.

  • In a recent press release, Firas Raad, World Bank Country Manager for South Sudan, stated that survivors of gender-based violence “require substantial support to recover from the physical and psychological trauma that they are suffering from,” adding that providing them with opportunities to learn new and income-generating skills could also significantly improve their lives.

  • Gladys Jambi, a Gender Affairs Officer with the peacekeeping operation, believes that detrimental and deeply rooted cultural norms, such as the stigma and discrimination experienced by survivors of gender-based violence, impede women’s dreams.

At the end of this year’s 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence, important people called for an end to stigma, gender discrimination, and all stereotypes about women and girls who have survived violence. Also, they said again that they would help them get into training programs, medical facilities, and other services.

Jacquiline Natepi, the executive director of the Rural Women Empowerment Organization, said that the key to reaching this goal is “streamlining efforts to help survivors of abuse recover from trauma and build social and economic lives.”

The South Sudanese government, the World Bank, the United Nations, and other collaborators are fighting tooth and nail to coordinate their response plans in that direction.

In July of last year, there was a glimmer of hope when the World Bank approved a grant of $70 million to support a project to improve women’s social and economic empowerment. The project included helping female entrepreneurs get their businesses registered and grow.

In South Sudan, there are many different kinds of violence, especially against women and children. Domestic violence, early or forced marriages, and sexual assaults, including rapes, are the three main types of violent crimes that are commonly committed; rape is frequently used as a weapon of war, according to Ms. Natepi.

In a recent press release, Firas Raad, the World Bank country manager for South Sudan, said that survivors of gender-based violence “need a lot of help to recover from the physical and mental trauma they are going through.” He also said that giving them chances to learn new skills that could help them make money would also make a big difference in their lives.

Gladys Jambi, who works for the peacekeeping operation as a Gender Affairs Officer, thinks that harmful and deeply rooted cultural norms, like the shame and discrimination that survivors of gender-based violence face, get in the way of women’s dreams.

She said, “UNMISS is working with line ministries and other partners to deal with and stop rapes and other forms of violence.” We do our best to make sure that survivors have the protection they need and that there are systems in place for prevention and response, while also working hard to hold offenders accountable.

South Sudan’s Minister of Gender, Child, and Social Welfare, Aya Benjamin, says that helping survivors recover and letting them fully participate in civic and economic life will help not only women but the whole country.

She also said that improving women’s finances is essential and will make our country more prosperous and peaceful.

“As they gain basic financial stability, they are more likely to be able to pay for essential medical care, send their kids to school, and do a better job in higher leadership roles at all levels of government.” In other words, they influence their local communities for the better.

Gladys Jambi succinctly encapsulated the hopes of all.

“I have just one wish: to see a South Sudan that is free from fear and favour, where peace and security reign, and where women, girls, men, and boys have equal opportunity.”

APO Group sent this out on behalf of the UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS).

APO has issued this press release. The editorial team of AUN News does not monitor the content, and none of the content has been checked or validated by our editorial, proofreaders, or fact checkers. The issuer is solely responsible for the content of this announcement.

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