Lords advise the government to use Covid lessons to stop climate change

Date:

Lords advise the government to use Covid lessons

  • News by AUN News correspondent
  • AUN News – ISSN: 2949-8090

Summary:

A House of Lords report argues that people must change their behaviour to reduce carbon emissions by a third by 2035. According to the report, information campaigns like those used during the COVID-19 outbreak will encourage people to take action against climate change. The study recommends financial aid for people to switch to greener lifestyles. The public is hungry for action, and 85% of people are concerned about climate change, the committee says. The wealthiest 10% of Britons have almost twice the national average carbon footprint. It urges the government to broaden the ELMS program, which pays farmers for their environmental efforts.

According to a House of Lords assessment, informational campaigns like those used during the COVID-19 outbreak will encourage people to take action against climate change.

It states that for the UK to reduce emissions by a third by 2035 to reach climate targets, people must alter their behaviour.

It describes the current government strategy as “extremely inadequate.”

The government responded by stating that it is firmly dedicated to achieving its legally required net zero climate targets.

The House of Lords study also suggests that the government provide financial aid to encourage people to switch to greener lifestyles, vehicles, and residences.

However, calls to influence behaviour conflict with Prime Minister Liz Truss’ emphasis on not interfering in people’s lives.

She told the Conservative Party Conference, “I’m not going to tell you what to do, what to think, or how to live your life.

A public education drive to cut back on energy use this winter was also disregarded by Ms. Truss.

Baroness Warsi says that people will live different lives and choose to make other changes, but we’re clear that people need to be assisted in moving this forward. The report’s author, Kate Parminter, chair of the House of Lords Environment and Climate Change Committee, spoke to BBC News.

According to her, the COVID-19 pandemic taught us vital lessons about effectively explaining science to the general population.

“Climate change is a crisis, just as COVID was.” “We can pick up on some crucial messages about communication and the scope of the issue,” she adds.

The paper identifies the three main areas where behavioral change is necessary: transportation, food, and energy.

It suggests that the government should make cycling and walking more accessible and offer scholarships so people can migrate to electric cars.

The committee implores the government to consider a frequent flyer levy, which would increase fees for frequent flyers.

According to the committee, the government has to launch a statewide home-insulation campaign to address our homes’ high energy costs and carbon footprint.

  • How is the UK doing, and what is net zero?

  • Deleted: the climate plan recommending a transition to a plant-based diet

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It urges the government to broaden the ELMS program, which pays farmers for their environmental efforts, which Ms. Truss’s administration is currently considering.

However, the group concluded that levies on environmentally harmful foods shouldn’t be implemented immediately.

According to Baroness Parminter, the government has a “huge reluctance” to “be forthright with the people about how much change is needed in terms of how we travel, how we heat our homes, and what we eat and buy.”

The legally required goal of attaining net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 is one to which the government is still completely committed, according to a representative for the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy who spoke to BBC News.

The public is hungry for action, and 85% of people are highly concerned about climate change, according to information provided to the committee.

According to the paper, public messaging campaigns can enormously alter behavior. It also notes how widely recycled materials are used.

But it insists that the core of any transformation must be justice. The committee was informed that the wealthiest 10% of Britons have a carbon footprint almost twice the national average and have a greater outstanding obligation to cut their emissions.

It also cautioned that the government must take precautions against corporate interests trying to thwart behavior change, citing cigarette businesses that sabotaged anti-smoking initiatives.

Analysis by: Advocacy Unified Network

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